Other Ways To Say This Essay Will Discuss In Interview

At the end of the interview, you have the opportunity to make a closing statement. Those are the last words you will utter before you leave the office, so make them count. Since there is no definitive way to close an interview, below are some options for you to consider.

Summary Close. Provide the interviewer with a synopsis of your experience. Remember that competency-based interviews are rooted in details, so bring them up again. For example, "As a quality-focused IT professional with more than ten years of experience as a systems technician and software/hardware support specialist, I have demonstrated a proven ability to create and deliver solutions that meet corporate objectives tied to business and technology performance. I am skilled in proactively identifying and resolving critical systems/network issues that will benefit the IT department. As such, I hold a sincere interest in joining your team."

Direct Close. If you want the job, then ask for it. For example, "Thank you for taking the time to interview me today. Based on our conversation, my background is a perfect fit with the job requirements we discussed. Given that, I am interested in joining your team."

Balance Sheet Close.Remind the interviewer of the core competencies that were stressed during the interview and how your background is a natural fit. For example, "This interview has been informative. From our discussion, it is evident that the position requires an accounting representative with experience in processing payroll, quarterly payroll returns, and general ledger account reconciliation. As I demonstrated, I have the know-how in each category to begin working with little or no training. When can I expect to hear from you?"

Compliment Close. Summarize the aspects of the position and/or company that intrigue you. For example, "Over the years, your organization has been the leader in laser technology. The new strides and the direction your organization is taking demonstrate a strong commitment to the field. Since I take my career seriously and have strived to be the best I can be, I would like to join your team."

Standing-Room-Only Close. If you received an offer from another company before you went to the interview, let the interviewer know. For example, "I received a job offer yesterday and decided to interview today because your organization piqued my interest. After today's meeting, I am glad I made the decision to interview with you. This position is my first choice. When do you expect to make a hiring decision? The other employer is expecting my response by the end of the week."

Testimonial Close. Add a compliment that you received from a customer, management, or business associate. For example, "At my last performance review, my supervisor indicated that I have superior client support skills. She noted that I successfully met the company's expectations when managing hundreds of support calls per day under strict time constraints and guidelines. I would like to bring my experience to work for your department."

Trial Close.
Offer to demonstrate your ability to perform the tasks. For example, "If it would make the decision easier, I would like to work on a trial basis to demonstrate the event planning skills I have honed over the years. You will find that my ability to manage details and execute plans and promotions will compliment your department's needs. How about I participate in an audition interview where you hire me on a probationary period so you can see me in action before you make a final decision?" Chances are, interviewers will put emphasis on the last words you shared, so choosing a closing statement that fits your personality, the position, and the interviewer's expectations will leave a lasting impression.

There's much more to the close of a competency-based interview than simply shaking hands and saying good-bye. The end of the interview gives you one last chance to make a strong impression, to summarize why you are the right person for the job, and to correct any misconceptions that may have cropped up. You can also find out what to expect next.



Excerpted from 201 KNOCKOUT ANSWERS TO TOUGH INTERVIEW QUESTIONS: The Ultimate Guide to Handling the New Competency-Based Interview Style, by Linda Matias. Copyright © 2009 Linda Matias. Published by AMACOM Books, a division of American Management Association, New York, NY.  Used with permission.  All rights reserved. http://www.amacombooks.org.

Visitors to this site are granted permission to download or print out one (1) copy of the AMACOM content from the website for personal use only and agree not to reproduce, retransmit, distribute, disseminate, sell, publish, broadcast or circulate this material without prior written permission of the copyright owner (AMA).

How to sell yourself in a job interview

In a job interview, the way you talk about yourself is a deciding factor in your success. These six tips will help you get hired.

Highlight your skills in an interview to get the job.

Want to know how to sell yourself in an interview? There are six things you'll need to do:

1. Show that you can be the solution to a problem.
2. Use specific examples.
3. Talk in soundbites.
4. Explain the "how" behind your accomplishments.
5. Use the right nonverbal communication.
6. Show enthusiasm.

Here's how to get this formula right—so that you can impress the hiring manager and score yourself a new job in no time.

1. Be the solution

Companies fill or create positions because they have problems they want to solve—for instance, ineffective advertising or long customer-service lines. So prepare for an interview by identifying the problems hinted at in the job ad. (If there's no job ad, research the company and industry.) Then, prepare examples detailing how you'll solve those problems—and how you've solved similar problems in the past. Practice telling stories about specific results you've achieved.

And if you're interviewing for a career change, keep in mind that many problems—such as a lack of effective project management or a breakdown of teamwork—are not industry-specific. Offering solutions to these problems is a great way to overcome a lack of directly applicable experience.

2. Be specific

Avoid empty clichés. Be prepared to back up your claims about your skills or characteristics with relevant and specific stories. For example, don't just say you "work well with others"—talk about the types of teams you've worked with and what you've learned from them. Or if you plan to say you're "detail-oriented," come to the interview prepared with a story about how your attention to detail saved a former employer money (or otherwise saved the day).

3. Prepare sound bites

Prepare three or four effective sound bites that highlight your skills and past successes. A sound bite is succinct and direct, so it's catchy and easy to remember -- for example, "I've designed logos for three Fortune 500 companies" or "My efficiency plan decreased product-delivery times by 15 percent without costing the company a cent."

When you're coming up with your sound bites, ask yourself, "What were my greatest accomplishments at my most recent job?" and "What sets me apart from other candidates?"

4. Prepare to talk about your resume

Your resume and cover letter will likely form an outline for at least part of your interview. Because a resume has to be brief, it probably says many things that could be elaborated on or explained in more detail. Often a resume explains the "what" (for instance, "supervised two people"). Use the interview to talk about the "how," as well as skills you gained, praise you received and so on.

5. Be aware of nonverbal communication

You say a lot about yourself with nonverbal language: your posture and your facial expressions, for instance. Sit up straight—leaning forward can make you seem closed off, as can holding a briefcase or purse in your lap. Maintain eye contact when answering interview questions, and smile frequently. Also, practice your handshake with a friend: An overly aggressive handshake can be as off-putting as a limp o

6. Be positive

Avoid complaining about a former employer or laying blame at a former manager's feet—doing so will likely make you seem difficult to work with (or disloyal). Even if you quit your last job in a rage because you had an incompetent manager, saying something like, "I felt I was ready for a more challenging position—like this one seems to be," turns a potentially interview-killing situation into something that makes you look very attractive to a hiring manager.

Interviewing is no doubt one of the tricker parts of getting a job. Need more help? Join Monster today. As a member, you'll get career advice and tips sent directly to your inbox to help you become a standout candidate who gets noticed—and hired.


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