750 Word Essay American Dream

Themes In Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby

Themes in Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby

The American Dream
On first glance, The Great Gatsby is about a romance between Gatsby and Daisy. The true theme behind this wonderful novel is not merely romance, but is also a very skeptical view of the extinction of the American dream in the prosperous 19s. This loss of the American dream is shown by Fitzgerald's display of this decade as a morally deficient one. He shows its incredible decadence in Gatsby's lavish and ostentatious parties. This materialistic attitude toward life came from the disillusionment of the younger generation of the old Victorian values. Also, with Prohibition in effect, illegal bootlegging practices made for yet another way for Americans to fall down the path of greed, pleasure, and decadence. Nick and Gatsby represent the skeptical younger generation fed up with the "old ways." Gatsby's involvement in organized crime is his turn from the American dream of pursuit of happiness and the individual to "sit back, relax, and watch the money burn." Gatsby throws away his morals by trying to impress Daisy through getting obscenely rich. His goal to return Daisy and himself to their past as lovers is ruined and not reached by his own means of trying to get there. This is just the same as the American dream- money and decadence ruin it.
"‘I wouldn't ask too much of her,' I ventured. ‘ You can't repeat the past.' ‘Can't repeat the past?' He cried incredulously. ‘Why of course you can!'…he talked a lot about the past and I gathered that he wanted to recover something, some idea of himself perhaps, that had gone into loving Daisy."

The Social Class Clash
Another theme in The Great Gatsby is one that is very evident throughout the novel. It is the conflict between the new wealthy class of self-made men and the "old rich." This is most noticeable in the physical separation between them. The new rich live in West Egg and the old rich live in East Egg. The new rich people are not yet acclimated to being upstanding citizens so they are not well connected in the social world, not to mention their...

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Essay about Desecration of the American Dream in Glengarry Glen Ross

750 Words3 Pages

Desecration of the American Dream in Glengarry Glen Ross

Glengarry Glen Ross portrays a harsh view of American business that not only contradicts, but also befouls the values of the "American Dream." The idealistic importance of fairness, equality, and the idea that hard work brings success included in this "dream" of American society is clearly not reality in this play. The values of work ethic, and equal opportunity are betrayed, and there is a notable presence of racism, sexism, and an savage system of "dog-eat-dog" competition.
     A main focus of the play is the never-ending hunt for leads. "Leads" are cards containing information on prospective customers with…show more content…

21). Dave Moss, another salesman later refers to Polish clients as "deadbeat Polacks" (p 29). He then goes on to degrade Indian clients. Richard Roma, a recently successful salesman also refers to Indians as "deadbeat wogs," and says, "[if] Fuckin' Shiva handed him a million dollars and told him 'sign the deal,' he wouldn't sign." (p. 63). America is proud of its reputation as a "melting pot" for many races from all over the world all coming together. However, this type of racial hatred makes the description of American society as a "salad bowl" seem much more accurate. These statements clearly show the contempt for minorities, as generally hard-working immigrants are criticized for their conservation in spending money.
The presence of sexism is more subtle, but nonetheless notable. There seems to be an assumed connection between masculinity and selling ability. Shelly Levine attributes manager John Williamson's inability to run an office and poor business ability to his lack of masculinity, saying, "you don't have the balls" (p. 76). Richard Roma also attacks Williamson, calling him a "cunt," and asking, "Whoever told you you could work with men?" (p. 96). Levine also insults Williamson for his incompetence, saying that he "isn't man enough" to know what to do, after informing a client that his

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