Human Communication Theory Comparative Essays About Food

Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

FE1006 Poverty and Development
FE1008 Data in Development Studies
FE1013 Introduction to Development Studies I
FE1014 Communication and Facilitation Skills in Development
FE1015 Rural Development Theory, Policy and Practice
FE1016 Introduction to Food Business
FE1017 Introduction to Food Marketing
FE1018 Introduction to Development Studies II
FE1019 Introduction to Food and Agricultural Economics
FE1020 Principles of Agricultural and Resource Economics
FE1021 Development, Conflict and Peace I
FE1022 Development, Conflict and Peace II
FE1023 Socio-Economic Concepts for International Development and Food Policy
FE1030 Introduction to International Food Policy
FE1101 Introduction to Food Business and Development
FE1301 Introduction to the Food Supply System
FE1314 Introduction to Rural Development
FE1315 Rural Organisations
FE1316 Rural Economy
FE1317 Rural Society
FE1318 Rural Environment
FE1319 Communications for Rural Development
FE1321 Social Farming
FE1322 Food Business
FE2002 Globalisation, Trade and Development
FE2003 Introduction to Sustainable Livelihoods Analysis
FE2200 Introduction to Food Supply Chain Management
FE2201 International Food Policy
FE2203 Food Economics
FE2204 Quantitative Research for Food
FE2311 Rural Research Methods
FE2312 Integrated Rural Development - Policy and Practice
FE2313 Rural Enterprise
FE2314 Integrated Rural Community Planning
FE2315 Professional Placement
FE2316 Rural Tourism
FE2318 Social Economy
FE2401 Principles of Food Marketing
FE3008 Programme Planning and Management
FE3009 Development Management and Organisations
FE3010 Gender and Development
FE3013 Work Placement
FE3014 Concepts of Development
FE3015 Socio-Economic Research in Development
FE3016 Micro-Finance and Development
FE3018 Agriculture and Natural Resource Use in the Developing World
FE3101 SME and Local Development
FE3201 Market-oriented New Food Product Innovation
FE3203 Food Market Research Methods
FE3204 Food Enterprise Management
FE3205 Food Marketing Management
FE3206 Transferrable Skills - Food Business and Development - Research Project
FE3222 Transferable Skills - Food Business and Development - Work Placement
FE3223 Transferable Skills - Food Business and Development - Research Project
FE3225 Transferable Skills ?Food Business and Development ?Entrepreneurship Work Placement
FE3300 Food Management and Marketing
FE3308 Marketing and Business Skills for Rural Enterprise
FE3310 Financial Management
FE3311 Project Planning and Management
FE3312 Research Project/Minor Thesis
FE3313 Marine Resources
FE3314 ICT and Rural Development
FE3315 Conservation and Management of the Rural Landscape
FE3824 People Management in Member-Based Organisations (online)
FE4002 Global Food Policy
FE4005 Advanced Programme Planning and Policy Processes
FE4006 Macro-Economic Issues and Development
FE4008 Food Security and the Developing World
FE4009 Co-operative Business and the Rural Economy
FE4012 Humanitarian Action in Development
FE4015 Co-operative Enterprise (not on offer until 2019/20)
FE4205 Consumer Behaviour in Food Markets
FE4206 International Food Retail Marketing
FE4207 Global Food Supply Chain Management
FE4405 Food Choice Analysis
FE4412 Sustainable Development: Food, Natural Resources and Gender
FE4414 Co-operative Banking
FE4415 Research Project and Analytical Skills
FE4416 Rural Development Policy
FE4417 Contemporary Issues in Development
FE4418 Dissertation
FE4450 European Food Business
FE4475 Food Marketing and Entrepreneurship
FE5201 Foundation in Lean Supply Chain Management
FE6001 Advanced Food Consumer Behaviour
FE6002 Food Marketing Channel Theory
FE6004 Food Research Management and Methods
FE6005 Strategic Food Marketing
FE6006 Food Marketing Dissertation
FE6008 Food Marketing Channel Analysis Part 1
FE6009 Food Marketing Channel Analysis Part 2
FE6012 Social Entrepreneurship
FE6100 Dissertation in Co-operative Organisation, Food Marketing and Rural Development
FE6101 Food Business: Markets and Policy
FE6104 Practical Training Placement
FE6109 Co-operative Organisation: Theory and Concepts
FE6110 Food Markets and Policy
FE6111 Co-Operative Organisation: Theoretical Application and Practice
FE6112 Rural Development: Theory and Policy
FE6113 Rural Development: Application and Practice
FE6114 Introduction to Food Marketing
FE6115 Food Marketing and the Consumer
FE6116 Local Food Marketing: Application and Practice
FE6117 Introduction to Food Marketing
FE6118 Food Business Research Methods
FE6120 Food Business Analysis
FE6121 Food Business Project
FE6122 Food Industry Centred Research Project
FE6123 Dissertation in Food Business
FE6125 Economics of the Agri-food System
FE6201 Globalisation Issues - Food and Bioprocess Supply Chains
FE6202 Dissertation in Supply Chain Management
FE6501 Business Processes Across the Supply Chain
FE6502 Trends and Dynamics Across Dairy Markets
FE6503 Food Business Elective
FE6600 An Introduction to the National and Global Food Sector
FE6601 Co-operatives and the Third Sector
FE6602 Social Enterprises and Local Development
FE6701 Co-operative and Social Enterprise
FE6702 Social and Co-operative Entrepreneurship
FE6703 Co-operative and Social Enterprise Governance
FE6704 Education and Marketing for Co-operatives and Social Enterprise
FE6705 Innovation and Enterprise in Financial Co-ops and Mutuals
FE6706 Community Co-operatives and Social Enterprises
FE6707 Worker Co-operative Strategies
FE6708 Co-operative Food Processing and Supply
FE6709 Social Enterprises and the Developing World
FE6710 Dissertation in Co-operative and Social Enterprise
FE6711 Research Methodology
FE6712 Leadership and Change Management in Co-operative and Social Enterprises
FE6902 Global Food Policy Issues
FE6903 Food Security and Sustainable Livelihoods in the Developing World
FE6904 Co-operative Business and Food Supply
FE6905 Food Choice and Innovation

FE1006 Poverty and Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures ((including seminar discussions)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Nicholas Chisholm, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Nicholas Chisholm, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To develop an understanding of the linkages between poverty and development

Module Content: Introduction to poverty and development; poverty measurement; analysis of extent and nature of poverty; poverty and income distribution; poverty and development linkages.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain the different meanings and dimensions associated to the term 'development'
?Distinguish between the different concepts and approaches to measuring development
?Describe the global distribution of poverty and factors of differences in the distribution and incidence of poverty
?Outline the linkages between poverty reduction, economic growth and income distribution
?Examine the linkages between poverty, hunger and food security
?Describe the basic needs approach to development
?Discuss the linkages between poverty and the environment
?Appraise the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) as a framework for development.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (Essay - approximately 2,500 words).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Satisfactory Attendance at Lectures and Participation in Seminars.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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FE1008 Data in Development Studies

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Practicals (Computer-Lab Practical Classes).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Stephen Thornhill, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Stephen Thornhill, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To introduce the use and relevance of data analysis in development studies.

Module Content: Introduction to the scientific method of enquiry; uses of data, types of data used in development analysis; information quality; principles of sampling and survey design; data presentation; basic statistics.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Create reading lists for course projects using UCC's Catalogue to identify books and Electronic Resources to identify journal articles
?Search the internet in a critical way to identify quality and reviewed sites as sources of information for course projects/essays
?Reference various sources of information within the text of course projects/essays
?Write up a bibliography for a course projects/essays
?Source and download electronic sources of secondary data from recognised International Development Agencies' sites
?Manipulate electronic source data for presentation in tables, graphs and charts
?Outline the main features of an argument using secondary data and literature research
?Use spreadsheets for developing and presenting budget.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Assignment(s).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. (including computer lab-based assignments) and Satisfactory Attendance and participation at Lectures and Practicals.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination:

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FE1013 Introduction to Development Studies I

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (including seminar discussions).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Michael Fitzgibbon, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Edward Lahiff, Department of Food Business and Development; Mr Michael Fitzgibbon, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: (i) To introduce students to the field of development studies (ii) To develop an understanding of concept of development, especially in the majority world context (iii) To explore alternative strategies for economic and social development.

Module Content: Various definitions of development are examined. The following are explored through theoretical and/or case-study approaches: principle development theories; linkages between poverty and development; colonialism and post-colonialism; corruption; gender and development; race and ethnicity.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify and discuss theoretical perspectives on development
?Identify and analyse views on poverty and development
?Identify the legacy of colonialism and impacts of post-colonialism
?Discuss and analyse gender in the context of development approaches
?Analyse the concepts of "race" and ethnicity in the context of modern mobility and migration.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (1 x 1,500 word written assignment).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Attendance will be monitored by a class register. 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted where students attend less than 80% of classes.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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FE1014 Communication and Facilitation Skills in Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Michael Fitzgibbon, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Mr Michael Fitzgibbon, Department of Food Business and Development; Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To give the student a good understanding of the theories and principles of communications. To impart communications skills implicit in development situations. To familiarise the student with technologies useful to communications.

Module Content: Theories and models of communications. The communications process - media/methods. Communications in the organisation. Written and verbal media skills, presentation skills, and group facilitation. Press releases and using multimedia for communications.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss the theoretical background to human communication.
?Identify and analyse problems and difficulties associated with crossing cultures in the context of communications.
?Discuss and analyse the flow of communication within organisations, and deterrents to effective communication, and the means to improving communications.
?Discuss the benefits and shortcomings of current media utilisation within developing country contexts.
?Analyse the various means of managing group communications and practical group facilitation in development situations.
?Discuss the ethical underpinning for research and development in the South.
?Identify the key tasks associated with delivering professional presentations.
?Identify the key tasks required for participatory group facilitation.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Continuous assessment comprising a group research project: group report, 70 marks; individual research diary, 20 marks; group presentation, 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance will be monitored by a class register. 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted where students attend less than 80% of classes.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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FE1015 Rural Development Theory, Policy and Practice

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: The objective of this module is to introduce and familiarise the student with a theoretical, policy and practical context for rural development.

Module Content: Interpretation of the Rural Development Problem
Defining Rural Development and Rural Development Policy
Evolution of Rural Development Policy (EU and Ireland): an examination of the driving forces of change
Theories of Rural Development
Current Rural Development Policy (EU and Ireland)
Current Rural Development Practice - Comparative Case Studies (EU and Ireland)
An introduction to some of the contemporary issues in Rural Development
Sustainable Rural Development - The role of Fair Trade Social Enterprise.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain the major concepts and definitions of rural development.
?Outline and explain the evolution of EU and Irish rural development policy.
?Describe some of the contemporary problems facing local and rural communities.

?Describe and discuss the rural development policies and strategies that have been implemented in response to contemporary rural problems.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 120 marks; Continuous Assessment 80 marks (1 x 2,500 word essay-).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business and Development.).

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FE1016 Introduction to Food Business

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other (up to 6 x 1 hr(s) tutorials).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Mr Ronan O'Farrell, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide students with an understanding of the food business chain by evaluating the salient issues addressed by various stakeholders.

Module Content: An examination of the factors that influence the Food Business system from production to consumption. The module will also examine food policy issues and their effect on information flow.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify and consider the implications of macro trends on consumer food demands;
?List the key strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats facing the food sector;
?Describe the current market environment for food manufacturers and explain how this might impact on food manufacturers' activities;
?Demonstrate how government intervention in food supply impacts supply chain stakeholders.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks ( 5 In-Class quizzes).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business & Development).

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FE1017 Introduction to Food Marketing

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other (up to 6 x 1 hr(s) small group meetings).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Mary McCarthy, Department of Management and Marketing.

Lecturer(s): Prof Mary McCarthy, Department of Management and Marketing.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the key marketing concepts and apply these to the food industry.

Module Content: This module also provides an introduction to food marketing and addresses the following topics: the marketing concept, marketing research, market segmentation, marketing strategy and target marketing, product choice, pricing, promotion and distribution in relation to the food industry.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define what food marking is and demonstrate the tasks undertaken in food marketing;
?Explain and illustrate how consumer markets can be broken down into smaller more manageable groups;
?List and describe the components of the marketing mix. Illustrate their relevance in the food products category;
?Summarise market information and use this information to develop simple research questionnaires.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (60 marks group project, and 40 marks 5 in-class quizzes).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business & Development).

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FE1018 Introduction to Development Studies II

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): FE1013

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (including seminar discussions).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Edward Lahiff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Edward Lahiff, Department of Food Business and Development; Mr Michael Fitzgibbon, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: (i) To develop an advanced understanding of concepts of development (ii) To engage with the debate among practitioners and academics concerned with economic and social progress in the developing world.

Module Content: Key development themes and issues are explored through theoretical and/or case-study approaches; global health; impacts of HIV/AIDS on development; interventions such as microfinance and microenterprise; participative approaches; race and ethnicity; conflict.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Apply the concept of global health to issues of unequal access to health services and health outcomes
?Demonstrate understanding of the causes of food insecurity and famine, and responses to these
?Identify and discuss the impacts of HIV/AIDS on development
?Identify and analyse the linkages between conflict and development
?Define the different approaches to microfinance and microenterprise.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (1 x1,500 word assignment (30 marks); group work and presentation (20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Attendance will be monitored by a class register. 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted where students attend less than 80% of classes.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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FE1019 Introduction to Food and Agricultural Economics

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Stephen Onakuse, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Stephen Onakuse, Department of Food Business and Development; Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To gain an understanding of the fundamentals of economic problems, develop an understanding of economic theory especially price and output determination; cost and production theories, demand and supply and evaluating the implications for agri-food in relation to small farms or peasant farming systems and managing emerging issues in agriculture.

Module Content: The module introduces the application of microeconomics for a diverse set of firms ranging from farms to food and agribusiness organisations. The behaviour of firms as prices and outputs are determined, applied production theories with respect to subsistence farming, choice of technique, analysis of technical change, and risk and uncertainty; agricultural demand, prices and markets; and farm management economies applied to subsistence agriculture.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an understanding of the principles, concepts, and expression of production economics, as applied to problems in agriculture and the food system;
?integrate principles and practice to develop the capacity to conceptualize and analyze problems within the agricultural system and a wide variety of other contexts;
?Analyse the behaviour of final consumers with respect to agricultural food products;
?Manage emerging issues in agriculture, food production and the industrialization of agriculture.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 2,000 word assignment).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business and Development.).

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FE1020 Principles of Agricultural and Resource Economics

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Stephen Onakuse, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Stephen Onakuse, Department of Food Business and Development; Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To understand the nature and behaviour of agricultural markets and price relationships among markets. Why they are different from the markets for other consumer goods. Why market structure matters to market outcomes and to develop effective analytical tools for thinking about the business environment in which buying and selling decisions are made.

Module Content: The module explores different types of markets; perfect competition; the most fundamental of the market structures; applied production theory with respect to subsistence farming, choice of technique, analysis of technical change, farm size questions; agricultural transformation and rural development; developing and implementing a marketing plan; The Agricultural Business System and farm management economies applied to smallholder agriculture.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Analyse traditional problems relating to developing and implementing a marketing plan, evaluate the relationship between agri-food business industries and smallholder farmers;
?Understand agricultural development and food supply;
?Apply marginal analysis to predict the optimal use of economic resources by consumers and producers of goods and services;
?Use economic criteria to critically examine agricultural transformation policy;
?Manage emerging issues in agriculture, agricultural systems and the industrialization of agriculture.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 2,000 word assignment).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business and Development.).

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FE1021 Development, Conflict and Peace I

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): FE1022

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Michael Fitzgibbon, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Mr Michael Fitzgibbon, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To examine the causes and effects of conflict, the means used to mitigate conflict, and post-conflict consequences with particular reference to development and developing country contexts.

Module Content: Development of conflict frameworks and other modelling tools that explain conflict and conflict-resolution processes. Approaches and issues in conflict resolution and peace-making and peace keeping; issues related to post-conflict recovery. The role of the media in conflict. Race, ethnicity, racisms and genocide.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe and use conflict frameworks
?Describe the main approaches to conflict resolution
?Define and discuss "race" and ethnicity in the context of conflict
?Define genocide and identify the causes of recent genocides
?Critique the role of the media in the creation and mitigation of conflicts and disputes.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (Report - 1,500 words).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Attendance will be monitored by a class register. 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted where students attend less than 80% of classes.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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FE1022 Development, Conflict and Peace II

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): FE1021

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Michael Fitzgibbon, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Mr Michael Fitzgibbon, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To examine the causes and effects of conflict, the means used to mitigate conflict, and post-conflict consequences with particular reference to development and developing country contexts.

Module Content: The gendered issues and impacts of conflict; the relationships between food security, famine and conflict; the development of sustainable livelihoods in societies emerging from conflict; conflict and children; the impact of terrorisms on development; relevant human rights legislation; asylum, refugees, and internally displaced people. Case studies covering each of these areas are used to develop understandings.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Differentiate between the nature of refugees, asylum-seekers and internally displaced people.
?Identify the linkages between conflict, food security and famine
?Identify the similarities and differences between refuges, asylum-seekers and internally displaced people.
?Discuss the impacts of conflict on development, gendered impacts of conflict and impacts on children
?Discuss the main international human rights legislations.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (Report - 1,500 words).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Attendance will be monitored by a class register. 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted where students attend less than 80% of classes.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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FE1023 Socio-Economic Concepts for International Development and Food Policy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 20, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Edward Lahiff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Edward Lahiff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the socio-economic concepts relevant to the study of international development and food policy; to develop the student's ability to apply such concepts throughout their subsequent course of study.

Module Content: The module introduces students to a range of socio-economic concepts relevant to the study of international development and food policy in a manner suitable for those with no prior study of the field. These include: growth, poverty, inequality and redistribution; individual and market-wide demand; concepts and measures of national income; producers and market theories; structure of the economy; markets, prices and market failures; economics of food demand; human capital and human development; globalisation and trade; the economic development process.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Provide basic definitions of key socio-economic concepts;
?Demonstrate how these concepts are applicable in the field of international development and food policy;
?Discuss the assumptions underlying these concepts and the possible bias they might contain;
?Explain where further and more detailed information on these concepts might be found.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (2 x In-class tests 20 marks, written paper 1,500 words 30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the department.).

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FE1030 Introduction to International Food Policy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Thia Hennessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Edward Lahiff, Department of Food Business and Development; Prof Thia Hennessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To inform students of key elements of contemporary international food policy.

Module Content: Introduction to the scope of food policy; absolute and comparative advantage; food policy and trade linkages; developing and developed world food trade patterns; the WTO; and case studies of food policies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the importance of food policy in development;
?Describe the influence of WTO in food policy;
?Link changes in food policy to processes of globalization; and
?Link food policy in action to specific examples.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (Essay of 1,500-2,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business and Development).

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FE1101 Introduction to Food Business and Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 8 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Ms Bridget Carroll, Department of Food Business and Development; Dr Stephen Onakuse, Department of Food Business and Development; Prof Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide an understanding of food business chains, an appreciation of the role of cooperatives in food business and development and an understanding of the interlinkages between food security and development

Module Content: Introduction to food supply chains. Introduction to cooperative organisation and management issues in food business and development situations. Introduction to issues in food security and development

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the key components of a marketing strategy for a new food firm;
?Differentiate between successful and unsuccessful marketing strategies;
?Evaluate the role marketing plays in a new food product success;
?Explain the most important differences between co-operative businesses and conventional businesses;
?Classify co-operatives according to their prime beneficiaries and give examples of the kinds of businesses operated within each category;
?Identify the financial dilemmas confronting co-operatives and explain how successful co-operatives have managed to resolve those dilemmas;
?Identify the inter-linkages between HIV/AIDS and poverty, agricultural development and sustainable livelihoods; and
?Evaluate the policies that allow people to break out of the poverty-hunger-malnutrition trap.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Seminar Presentation and Essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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FE1301 Introduction to the Food Supply System

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Stephen Onakuse, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Stephen Onakuse, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide the student with an understanding of the development of and characteristics of the food business chain.

Module Content: Development of the contemporary food system. Key issues for the global food system. Factors that influence the food business system from production to consumption. Profile and structure of the European and Irish agri-food sectors. Food company case studies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the development of the contemporary food supply chain.
?Identify key challenges for the global food system.
?Explain the key influences on the contemporary food system.
?Describe key characteristics of the European food industry.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (in-class test (20 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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FE1314 Introduction to Rural Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials (Distance Education Module, Continuous Assessment)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide students with an overview of the key aspects of rural development in an Irish and European Context.

Module Content: This introductory module provides a context for many of the ideas and concepts explored in later modules. The key content areas include:
? Key concepts, approaches, theories and practices associated with rural development;
? Evolution of rural development in Ireland and EU;
? Current issues of development in rural Ireland; and
? Role and functions of organizations and agencies involved in rural development.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define and explain the major concepts and approaches associated with rural development;
?Describe the evolution of rural development in Ireland and EU;
?Discuss the current issues of development in rural Ireland;
?Identify the most significant organizations and agencies involved in rural development and discuss their role; and
?Participate in debates on rural development in Ireland.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Essay/project - 1,500-2,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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FE1315 Rural Organisations

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials (Distance Education Module, Continuous Assessment)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To outline to the students the diversity of organisations that contribute to the sustainable development of rural areas.

Module Content: The module will examine the different types of organisations that exist and will investigate the distinguishing features of these organisation. In addition the module will explore the factors that led to the emergence of these organisation and how they contribute to sustainable rural development

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Differentiate different types of organisations in a rural context;
?Describe and discuss the different legal structures available to rural based organisations;
?Discuss differences between conventional and alternative forms of organisations;
?Compare and contrast different forms of organisations;
?Discuss the development of the partnership approach to rural development; and
?Classify co-operatives according to their prime beneficiaries and define the concept of the co-operative according to co-operative principles and according to the co-operative theory of action.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (essay/project - 1,500-2,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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FE1316 Rural Economy

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials (Distance Education Module, Continuous Assessment)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To develop an understanding of the economic elements of consumption, production, and trade in rural areas and to provide the tools to analyze them.

Module Content: The module explores basic micro and macroeconomic concepts and empirical methods related to agricultural and nonagricultural activities in rural areas, the role and impact of regional, national and international policies, and the implications of the changing economic landscape for social and political development in rural areas.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the components of the rural economy;
?Describe and be able to discuss the changing role of agriculture in rural economies;
?Demonstrate an understanding of the economic linkages at the local, national and international level;
?Understand the concepts of production functions, production costs, and the interaction of businesses in a marketplace;
?Identify current and potential alternative income sources in a rural area (multifunctionality);
?Analyse the drivers of rural labour demand and labour supply and how they interact;
?Identify and evaluate issues of income distribution in the context of rural development; and
?Analyse the role and impact of policy incentives on rural economic activity.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Essay/Project - 2,500-3,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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FE1317 Rural Society

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials (Distance Education Module, Continuous Assessment)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To introduce the student to a sociological interpretation of the changing nature of rural society.

Module Content: Includes an introduction to rural sociology and an examination of rural social change and the related consequences for rural society.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Competently describe the key aspects of rural society in a state of change;
?List the changes that have taken place in rural society in Ireland over time;
?Relate social theory to traditional, modern, and post-modern rural society;
?List the differentiations between urban and rural sociology; and
?Enumerate the challenges for rural society globally and locally.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Essay/project - 2,500-3,000 words)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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FE1318 Rural Environment

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials (Distance Education Module, Continuous Assessment)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide an understanding of the Irish rural environmental heritage and to develop skills and tools for its analysis, utilization, and sustainable management.

Module Content: The module provides tools for the economic evaluation of the environment and of natural resources, and the rationale and impact of key environmental policies affecting rural stakeholders.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define and describe the structural organisation and processes of natural and agricultural ecosystems;
?Analyse the role of natural resources, such as renewable energies, in the economic base of a rural area;
?Demonstrate skills to critically analyze the role of sustainability and biodiversity and rural resource management;
?Discuss the theories that underlie environmental policies to correct market failures;
?Discuss and evaluate global and national environmental policies and their impact on local rural communities;
?Explain and evaluate basic measures of environmental sustainability;
?Discuss the sources of greenhouse gas emissions and the contribution of the various sectors nationally and internationally; and
?Appraise the environmental impact of rural enterprises and rural actions.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Essay/Project - 2,500-3,000 words)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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FE1319 Communications for Rural Development

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials (Distance Education Module, Continuous Assessment)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To examine the key role of communications in rural development as well as providing the student with practical communications skills and knowledge.

Module Content: The module examines the role of communications in rural development and presents the main theories related to communications. This module will provide the student with an insight into the main communication methods used in rural development and will help in developing skills in disseminating information. Particular communication media and methods are addressed in the context of rural development processes. Specifically skills related to the use of mass media; public speaking, group communications and written communications methods are developed due to their importance in enabling rural development.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain the critical role of communications in the development process;
?Understand the theory of human communications;
?Describe the media and methods used in professional communications and evaluate the appropriateness of each for given situation;
?Plan a communications campaign;
?Analyse how groups work and how they achieve their goals;
?Demonstrate the skills to participate effectively as a group member, lead group processes and facilitate meetings; and
?Demonstrate skills related to the use of selected communications methods (individual communication / consultations, group methods such as lecture presentations and meetings, mass media such as preparing press articles and radio presentations, write effective project proposals and reports.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Written assignment (2,500-3,000 words) 100 marks. Student lecture presentation 100 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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FE1321 Social Farming

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials (Distance Education Module, Continuous Assessment)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To examine social farming in the Irish and international context and explore the emerging role of social farming in rural development.

Module Content: This module develops participants' awareness and understanding of the concepts, the applications and the policy environment that surround the use of social farming practices in an Irish and European context. The term social farming covers all activities that use agricultural resources to promote, or to generate, social services in rural areas. Examples of these services include rehabilitation, therapy, sheltered employment, life-long education and other activities that contribute to social inclusion.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define Social Farming and describe how it has emerged as a form of service provision in rural areas;
?Explain the principles of Social Farming how it may be applied both for the benefit of people using services and for rural development;
?Map the nature, extent and range of settings in which social farming initiatives are being undertaken within Ireland and in the broader European context;
?Outline the drivers of Social Farming from a Rural Development and Health and Social Care Policy perspective;
?Critically assess the relevant national and European policy context across a wide range of policy domains and analyse how it impacts on the operation and development of Social Farming; and
?Evaluate the development requirements to establish a Social Farm from the perspective of multiple stakeholders.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Essay/Project - 2,500-3,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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FE1322 Food Business

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials (Distance Education Module, Continuous Assessment)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide an understanding of food business chains through an examination of the food business chain from producer to consumer with an emphasis on the roles and needs of the various stakeholders, particularly the rural producer and consumer.

Module Content: The module will examine the roles and needs of stakeholders along the food chain, in the context of the farmer viability, consumer demand and niche markets, retail structures, quality and traceability of food, environmental impact and sustainability. Both conventional and alternative approaches to addressing these issues will be discussed including CSA.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Understand the functions of the food supply chain and the role of the actors in the chain;
?Identify the ethical and environmental implications of the current food business model;
?Assess the role of the emerging models in the context of sustainable development;
?Explain the dimensions of organic food production, shortening the supply chain and the role of the consumer; and
?Analyse the policy framework directing the sector.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (essay/project - 2,500-3,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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FE2002 Globalisation, Trade and Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Edward Lahiff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Edward Lahiff, Department of Food Business and Development, and Dr Philip Dobie (Adjunct Professor).

Module Objective: (i) To develop an understanding of selected topics in international of development (ii) To analyse the process of globalisation and its impact on lives and livelihoods in the developing world.

Module Content: The international architecture of aid and development; key global challenges in development: climate change, population, migration; transnational corporations and international trade; globalisation of agriculture; debt; and aid.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Relate the impact of globalisation in developing country economies and societies;
?Interpret how the terms of trade, unequal exchange and the activities of trans-national corporations effect international trade and local economies;
?Explain the architecture of international and multi-lateral organisations involved in global development, trade and finance; and
?Explain the importance of key global challenges, such as change, population, migration.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (one research report - 3,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Satisfactory Attendance at Lectures and Participation in Seminars.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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FE2003 Introduction to Sustainable Livelihoods Analysis

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

Abstract

Policy, communication, and education efforts to influence any social or health outcome are more effective if based on an understanding of the underlying behaviors and their determinants. This conceptual paper outlines how behavioral theory can help design interventions for one healthy eating behavior, eating breakfast. More specifically, the paper illustrates how a prominent health behavior theory, the Reasoned Action Approach, can be used to guide formative research to identify factors underlying people’s decisions. Select findings are presented from three studies of beliefs underlying eating breakfast: online surveys with 1185 undergraduates from a large university in Indiana; in-depth interviews with 61 adults from four Indiana worksites; and 63 in-depth interviews with students from three middle schools in rural Indiana. Analyses of data from the undergraduates demonstrated the role of self-efficacy. Analyses of data from the working adults revealed the importance of normative beliefs about what employers believed. Analyses comparing consequences perceived by adults with those perceived by middle school students found that both groups believed that eating breakfast would provide energy but only middle school students believed that eating breakfast would improve alertness. For each finding, the theory is presented, the finding is described, implications for interventions are suggested, and the need for additional research is outlined. In sum, theory-based behavioral research can help develop interventions at intrapersonal, interpersonal, and environmental levels that are warranted to encourage healthy eating.

Keywords: Behavioral Analysis, Reasoned Action Approach, Health Behavior Theory, Breakfast Consumption, Public Health Interventions

Health professionals continue to search for ways to establish eating behaviors that promote good health (Glanz, 1999; Irvin, Ary, Grove & Gilfillian–Morton, 2004). As with any health behavior change, it is likely that efforts to encourage healthy eating need to consider components at multiple levels and to use a full range of intervention types, including structural, policy, communication, and education interventions (Bartholomew, Parcel, Kok, Gottlieb & Fernandez, 2011; Green & Kreuter, 2005). With regard to food choices, four levels of influence have been identified (Story, Newmark–Sztainer & French, 2002): intrapersonal influences (e.g., psychosocial, biological); interpersonal factors (e.g., family and peers); built environment (e.g., schools, fast food outlets, convenience stores); and macrosystem or societal factors (e.g., policies, mass media, social and cultural norms). How then should we decide the level, type, and content of interventions? The approach recommended here is to base interventions on a theory–based behavioral analysis (Glanz, 1999; Irvine et al., 2004). The purpose of this article is to illustrate how a behavioral analysis based on a prominent theory of behavior, the Reasoned Action Approach (Fishbein and Ajzen, 2010), can guide formative research which will help us understand how people make decisions about behaviors, will guide interventions to encourage the practice of healthy behaviors and will suggest additional research.

Theory–based behavioral analysis will be demonstrated with three studies of beliefs about eating breakfast. The behavior of eating breakfast has been defined by Albertson et al., (2007) as any food intake between 5:00AM and 10:00AM on weekdays or 5:00AM and 11:00AM on weekends. Regular consumption of breakfast has been associated with a number of health benefits affecting individuals across the life span, including lower rates of overweight and obesity, better food and nutrient profiles, increased opportunity to meet Dietary Guidelines for Americans, higher levels of physical activity, improved cognitive function and performance as well as psychosocial functioning (Affenito et al., 2005; Albertson et al., 2007; Deshmukh–Taskar, Nicklas, O’Neil, Keast, Radcliff & Cho, 2010; Harding, Teyhan, Maynard, & Cruickshank, 2008; Kerrer, Yang, Obayashi, Branchi & Song, 2006; Kleinman et al., 2002; Matthys, DeHenauw, Bellemans, DeMaeyer & DeBacker, 2007; Murphy et al., 1998; Pollitt & Matthews, 1998; Rampersaud, 2008). Yet, Niemeier, Raynor, Lloyd–Richardson, Rogers and Wing (2006) reported in their five–year longitudinal study of adolescents and adults that breakfast skipping markedly increased during the transition from adolescence to adulthood. The data described here examine beliefs about eating breakfast among three populations from the state of Indiana: undergraduates from a large university; employees from two rural and two urban worksites; and students from three rural middle schools.

The Reasoned Action Approach (RAA) is the latest formulation of the Theory of Reasoned Action, the Theory of Planned Behavior, and the Integrative Model (Fishbein & Ajzen, 2010). This theory outlines factors that are presumed determinants of behavior and that are common to several of the major theories of health behavior (Fishbein, Triandis, Kanfer, Becker, Middlestadt & Eichler, 2001). It has been used successfully to understand the factors underlying behavioral decision–making in a variety of domains (e.g., Albarracin, Johnson, Fishbein & Muellerleile, 2001; Godin & Kok, 1996). According to the RAA, the immediate determinants of a behavior are a person’s intention to engage in the behavior and their actual control as influenced by environmental factors and the individual’s skills and abilities. Intention is, in turn, influenced by a combination of three global components: attitude towards the act, defined as the positive or negative evaluation of the behavior; normative pressure based on the perception of what important others believe and do; and self–efficacy or perceived behavioral control about how much the behavior is seen as being under the control of the individual as opposed to the environment. These global components are themselves determined by sets of salient beliefs: behavioral beliefs about the salient consequences of the behavior for the attitude component; normative beliefs about what salient others believe for the normative component; and control beliefs about salient circumstances for the self–efficacy or perceived control component. Not all beliefs are considered to be potential causes. Only those that are at the top–of–the mind of the relevant segment of the population operate as causes according to the RAA. Thus, an important step in applying the RAA to intervention design is a salient belief elicitation to identity the subset of beliefs more frequently accessed when the segment of the population is asked to think about performing the behavior (Middlestadt, Bhattacharyya, Rosenbaum, Fishbein & Shepherd, 1996).

Method

Data used to illustrate the points in this conceptual paper come from larger studies. Details of the first study of undergraduates are presented elsewhere (Gassman, Agley, Johnston, Middlestadt, Youssefagha & Van Puymbroeck, 2012). Briefly, an online survey covering a number of health topics was conducted with 1185 undergraduates from one school of a large university in Indiana. In the section on nutrition, they were told that “Breakfast is the first meal of the day, usually in the morning” and asked “how many of the past 7 days did you eat breakfast?” Then they completed fixed–alternative items to assess the RAA constructs with respect to eating breakfast every day for the next month: two for intention, two for attitude toward the act, three for perceived norm, and two for self–efficacy. Scales were created by averaging the available responses for each of the four constructs and a regression analysis predicted intention from the three global components.

Details on the face–to–face interview studies of adult workers and of 7th and 8th grade students are presented in Middlestadt (2012). Briefly, quantitative data on behaviors and demographic characteristics were gathered from 243 adults from two rural and two urban worksites in Indiana and from 344 students from three middle schools in rural Indiana. Qualitative data eliciting beliefs about eating breakfast every weekday for the next three months were collected from a subsample of 63 middle school students and 61 adult workers. More specifically, participants were told “as you may know, health educators tell us to eat breakfast every day. We want to know what you think and feel about eating breakfast every week day for the next three months. There are no right or wrong answers. Just say what comes to your mind first.” Then they were asked six open–ended questions: two to elicit salient consequences (i.e., what are the advantages or good things that might happen if you eat breakfast every week day for the next three months? what are the disadvantages or bad things that might happen…?); two to elicit salient referents (i.e., who, which people or groups, might approve or support you when you eat breakfast every weekday for the next three months? Who, which people or groups, might disapprove …?); and two to elicit salient circumstances (i.e., what might make it easier for you to eat breakfast every weekday for the next three months? What might make it harder to…?). Categories were created based on a content analysis of verbatim responses. Frequency analyses revealed the percent who mentioned each category of salient beliefs.

Results and Implications

In the sample of undergraduates, participants were primarily white (88.0%) and female (68.1%). The mean age was 20.5 years old. About one–third (35.0%) of the undergraduates indicated they ate breakfast on all seven of the seven days before the survey. In the sample of middle school students, participants were primarily white (94.8%) and about half were female (53.2%). They were split between 7th grade (54.7%) and 8th grade (45.3%). They ranged in age from 12 to 15 years old (mean=13.1 years). About half (49.1%) of the middle school students ate breakfast on all five of the five weekdays before the interview. Most of 47 the adult participants were white (84.7%) and female (77.0%). Adults ranged in age from 23 to 67 years (mean=44.0). Most (65.6%) of the adult workers reported eating breakfast on all five of the five weekdays before the interview.

Identifying the Relative Importance of the Three Global Components

A key step in an RAA analysis is to determine the relative weights of the three global components in predicting intention and thus to identify which component(s) to address with an intervention. If the weight for the attitude component is high, the behavior is under the control of the attitudinal component and one could improve the behavior with an intervention that emphasizes particular advantages or disadvantages. If the weight for the normative component is high, the behavior is under the control of perceived norm and an intervention that addresses what significant others perceive is warranted. If the weight for the self–efficacy or perceived control component is high, one needs to change the self–efficacy component by influencing the circumstances that make the behavior easier or more difficult to perform.

The data from the undergraduates can illustrate how the key component is identified. The multiple R predicting intention from the three global factors was .855 (F=918.439, df=3, 1016, p<.0001). The relative weighs were .087 for attitude toward the act of eating breakfast every day, .152 for perceived norm, and .721 for self–efficacy or perceived behavioral control (Middlestadt et al., 2010). With a sample size of 1185, all three of the weights were statistically significant. However, it is clear from the size of the weights that eating breakfast is primarily under the control of the self–efficacy or perceived behavioral control global component. This implies that, at least for undergraduates from this large university in Indiana, interventions to encourage undergraduates to eat breakfast might address perceived control or self–efficacy.

The self–efficacy or perceived control component of the RAA assesses how individuals perceive their behavior and their environment. Do they believe the behavior is under their own control or is it outside of their control and under the control of the environment? This component can be addressed with two types of interventions. One approach would be an educational or skill–building intervention that helps the individual bring the environment under control by teaching them either how to shape their environment or how to navigate the environment they experience. For example, undergraduates might be taught where on campus to find breakfast or how to rapidly prepare a healthy one using food that is easy to keep on hand. An alternative approach would be a structural or policy intervention that actually changes the environment experienced by the individuals. Universities can allow food venders to locate in dormitories or classroom buildings and to provide healthy items that students can take with them to class.

Additional theory–based research would help determine which of these approaches is better and would provide content for the intervention. More specifically, a qualitative salient belief elicitation (as was conducted with the adult workers and the middle school students) would identify which circumstances are underlying the self–efficacy component. A quantitative study with a larger sample and close–ended items based on the qualitative results would determine which of the hindering or facilitating circumstances identified in the qualitative research are more strongly associated with intention. And an observation study would help determine what the environment actually looks like near and on campus.

Identifying a Differentiating Salient belief Underlying Perceived Norm

Once one has selected the component to address, one needs to identify the specific salient beliefs which need to be influenced in order to change this component. Data from the salient belief elicitation underlying the normative component can illustrate this role of theory. Adults workers from four worksites in Indiana were asked who (which people or groups) would approve or support them if they eat breakfast every week day as well as who would disapprove. Employers were the only social group elicited when these workers were asked who disapproved of eating breakfast. More specifically, 21.3% of the adult workers mentioned that employers might disapprove. To assess the importance of employer beliefs, the adults in the sample were divided into “doers” (40 ate breakfast on all five of the weekdays preceding the interview) and “non–doers” (21 who ate breakfast four or fewer days). A comparative analyses revealed that the percent mentioning employers as disapproving was statistically significantly higher (p <.05 with Fisher’s exact test) among “non–doers” (23.8%) than among “doers” (5.0%). More “non–doers” than “doers” see their employers as disapproving. Stated another way, the normative belief about what employers think a worker should do functions as a differentiating belief.

These data imply that the employer plays a vital role in influencing workers’ intentions to eat breakfast and suggest that any intervention to encourage eating breakfast must involve the employer. It may be that communications about the recommendation to eat breakfast would be more effective if they actually come from the worker’s employer. It may be that immediate, frontline supervisors need to be very clear when they talk with the people that work under them that they approve of breakfast. It may be that employers are critical in establishing a healthy work environment with supportive policies and structures.

Once again, behavioral theory recommends additional research to guide these intervention decisions. Larger scale quantitative research with the adult workers using close–ended items based on the qualitative analyses would verify and quantify the importance of normative beliefs about what employers think in predicting intention and behavior. Follow–up interviews with workers would help determine what employers do which lead workers to conclude they approve or disapprove. In addition, research with the employers would be useful. What do employers actually believe? Do employers understand the benefit of eating breakfast on productivity at work? Behavioral research on the beliefs that employers hold about the behavior of recommending their employees eat breakfast every week day would help identify the factors that influence employer decision–making.

Identifying which Salient Consequence to Emphasize

Educational and communication interventions that influence beliefs by pointing out the benefits of a behavior are important tools in the behavior change toolkit. With limited resources, it is cost–effective to prioritize beliefs. Furthermore, it is useful to determine if the same communication or education activity can be used for several audiences or if it is necessary to tailor the content and develop different communications for different segments of the population (Kreuter & Skinner, 2000). Theory–based analyses about beliefs can help identify which perceived benefits to emphasize and can help us determine when we need to design different interventions for different segments.

Comparative analyses of the beliefs about consequences of eating breakfast can illustrate how to select which belief to emphasize. Adult workers and middle school students were asked about the good things that might happen if they eat breakfast every weekday for the next three months. “Will give me energy” was one of the most frequently mentioned consequences for both of these segments of the population: 41.1% of the adults and 47.6% of the middle school children mentioned that eating breakfast every weekday would give them energy (p=0.476). While adults and middle school students were similar on their beliefs about the role of breakfast in providing energy, these two groups differed on the belief that eating breakfast “will wake me up or make me less tired.” Statistically significantly more students (46.6%) than adults (14.8%, p <.01) mentioned the effect of eating breakfast on alertness.

These findings suggest that a communication or education intervention targeting both adults and students could emphasize the perceived benefit of breakfast on energy. However, if one were tailoring interventions to middle school students, the intervention might do well to address the effect of breakfast on alertness. Behavioral theory suggests additional research to confirm and further develop these recommendations for intervention design. At a minimum, larger scale studies using close–ended items based on the results of the qualitative elicitation studies need to be conducted to provide quantitative data for more advanced analyses to confirm and clarify the results.

Conclusion

In order to encourage healthy eating habits, interventions of different types and at different levels are recommended. This conceptual paper illustrates how a theory–based behavioral analysis can help design interventions by identifying which beliefs to address when. Using the Reasoned Action Approach and studies of eating breakfast among college students, among adult workers, and among middle school students, we demonstrated how theory can be used to conduct formative research to design interventions. Analyses of data from undergraduate students demonstrated the role of self–efficacy in eating breakfast. Analyses of data from adults from four worksites revealed the importance of normative beliefs about what employers believed. And, analyses comparing consequences perceived by adults to those perceived by middle school students demonstrated similarities and differences in the belief structures of two groups. In each case, theory–based suggestions were made about interventions to try as well as about next research steps to consider. In general, it is clear that the factors influencing breakfast consumption include determinants at intrapersonal, interpersonal, and environmental levels and that interventions are needed at these different levels. Educational interventions might address beliefs held by individuals. Communication interventions might consider interpersonal relationships and communication with key influencers like employers. Interventions might focus on helping individuals deal with their present environment by building their skills at navigating or changing their environment. Interventions might be structural in nature, aiming to change the policy, physical or social environment. In sum, theory–based behavioral research can help define the level, type, and content of interventions to promote healthy eating.

Acknowledgements

Funding for the studies described here was provided by internal funds from Indiana University. The authors wish to acknowledge the many partners and participants who assisted with the studies.

Biographies

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Dr. Susan E. Middlestadt

Dr. Middlestadt is an Associate Professor in the School of Public Health, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. She conducts applied research to help design and evaluate theory-based and empirically-grounded health promotion, communication, and social marketing programs. Her interests include behavioral, evaluation, and intervention research on physical activity and nutrition behaviors underlying obesity and other chronic diseases. Her research has supported the development of social and behavior change programs for school-aged youth, young adults, women and men of reproductive age, and older adults in the United States and in developing countries. She has worked in community, school, clinic, worksite, and mass media settings. Dr. Middlestadt teaches courses to prepare students to use models and theories of health behavior and to design health interventions.

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Dr. Laurel D. Stevenson

Dr. Stevenson received her PhD in Health Behavior and her Master of Public Health degrees from Indiana University and she did her undergraduate work at the University of Michigan. Her research interests include mechanisms to build community capacity, participatory and qualitative research methods, theories of health behavior, and maternal/child health. She currently works as an independent research consultant.

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Chia-Ling Hung

Ms. Hung is a doctoral student in the PhD program in Health Behavior, School of Public Health, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. She holds a Masters in Physical Education from the National College of Physical Education and Sports, Taiwan. For her dissertation, she is conducting a meta-analysis of behavior change campaigns in healthy eating, physical activity, tobacco prevention, and other health behaviors to investigate the role of social marketing principles and techniques in making behavior change interventions more effective.

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Dr. Maria Leia Roditis

Dr. Roditis received a PhD in Bioanthropology, a Master of Public Health, and a MA in Anthropology, all from Indiana University. She uses an interdisciplinary social science perspective to research and address health issues. She has studied the environmental, historical, and social factors that affect rates of overweight and obesity among populations of adolescents in Greece. She is currently a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Center for Tobacco Research and Education, University of California, San Francisco, CA.

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Dr. Alyce D. Fly

Dr. Alyce D. Fly is an Associate Professor of Dietetics and Nutrition Science at Indiana University. Her research laboratory explores the effects of meal patterns on vascular health in healthy and overweight people, and factors that contribute to childhood obesity. She teaches courses in advanced nutrition and human metabolism, and food chemistry and leads a weekly research seminar.

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Dr. Jylana L. Sheats

Dr. Sheats received a PhD in Health Behavior from Indiana University and a Master of Public Health from the Tulane University, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, LA. Her research focuses on the psychosocial, behavioral and environmental determinants of physical activity and healthy eating and the impact of contextual factors on the health outcomes of minority and aging populations. She is currently a Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Stanford Prevention Center, Stanford University, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA.

Contributor Information

Susan E. Middlestadt, Indiana University, USA.

Laurel D. Stevenson, Indiana University, USA.

Chia-Ling Hung, Indiana University, USA.

Maria Leia Roditis, University of California, San Francisco, USA.

Alyce D. Fly, Indiana University, USA.

Jylana L. Sheats, Stanford University School of Medicine, USA.

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